PWCC Field Guide

Field Safety Guide 2017

Stay up to date with the industry best practices and the comprehensive
list of the major recognized safety hazards of professional window cleaning.
Stay Safe On The Job!

Contact Us

Introduction

This guide is dedicated to providing up to date information on the major safety hazards that may be encountered during professional window cleaning.

Select your section below to learn more.

Disclaimer

Through the OSHA and International Window Cleaning Association (IWCA) Alliance, IWCA developed this material for informational purposes only.

It does not necessarily reflect the official views of OSHA or the U.S. Department of Labor.

Contact Us

How to use this guide.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Mauris in sem vitae velit condimentum ultrices. Cras ac massa urna. Donec gravida, nunc sed dignissim convallis, massa velit vestibulum velit, ut feugiat risus turpis a sem. Curabitur placerat lorem vitae ligula cursus posuere. Ut convallis bibendum nunc et blandit. Curabitur metus quam, lacinia sed euismod auctor, pretium eu nulla. Nullam id viverra ante, eu pulvinar urna. Maecenas sed tristique odio. Nullam vestibulum orci at velit elementum tincidunt. In est ex, suscipit ut volutpat et, placerat quis mauris. Etiam porttitor eu nibh consectetur tincidunt. Ut mi ligula, tincidunt in turpis vitae, cursus suscipit risus. Suspendisse vel quam felis.

Search Field Guide Contents

Please choose a section or enter a search term.

OR

Search

Counter Weight Formula

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec vitae neque eget tortor hendrerit porttitor mattis nec quam. Nam tempor pulvinar tincidunt.

Formula

  • Purpose of Field Guide The purpose of this field guide is to provide you with a list of the major recognized safety hazards which may be encountered during professional window cleaning. This field guide also provides some of the key best practices to address these hazards and help you stay safe on the job.
  • Disclaimer Through the OSHA and International Window Cleaning Association (IWCA) Alliance, IWCA developed this material for informational purposes only. It does not necessarily reflect the official views of OSHA or the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • Employer Responsibilities Your employer must develop and provide a safe window cleaning operation to protect the safety and health of workers and the general public.

    Regardless of what type of equipment and tools may be used on the job, your employer must ensure that the equipment is properly inspected and maintained before it gets used. The employer must also ensure that employees are properly trained in a language they fully understand.

    Be sure to follow all manufacturers’ recommended guidelines for assembling, using, maintaining and inspecting any equipment used for cleaning windows.
  • Types of Window Cleaning Operations The following are the major types of window cleaning operations. Depending on the type of operation, workers may be faced with different safety and health hazards. The window cleaning industry is segmented into two categories: ground work and suspended work. Ground crews clean windows by accessing them using ground-based equipment, including extension poles, water fed poles, ladders and aerial man lifts. Suspended workers are supported on the sides and off the roofs of buildings while cleaning.
    • Commercial Work: Commercial work includes route work, low to mid-rise work and high-rise structures.
      • Route Work: A route company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on first or second floor commercial window cleaning and cleans these accounts on a recurring daily, weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis. This company’s accounts will include structures such as storefronts, shopping malls, professional buildings, restaurants, and automobile dealers.
      • Low to Mid-Rise Work: A low to mid-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on ground based operations that are typically performed on commercial buildings under five stories in height; often cleaned using non-suspended equipment such as ladders, extension poles, water fed poles and aerial work platforms.
      • High-Rise Commercial: A high-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on cleaning commercial structures that are more than four stories in height; often employees of high-rise window cleaning companies engage in suspended work using rope descending systems or suspended scaffolding.
    • Residential Work: A residential company is a window cleaning company that performs residential window cleaning.*
      *A residence is where people live, not where they work, so extra care and consideration must be taken to work safely around personal belongings, furniture, or stairs, for example.
    • Construction Cleaning: A post-construction cleaning company provides window cleaning services at the conclusion of the original construction of a structure. Construction cleaning occurs on both commercial and residential structures.
  • Purpose of Field Guide The purpose of this field guide is to provide you with a list of the major recognized safety hazards which may be encountered during professional window cleaning. This field guide also provides some of the key best practices to address these hazards and help you stay safe on the job.
  • Disclaimer Through the OSHA and International Window Cleaning Association (IWCA) Alliance, IWCA developed this material for informational purposes only. It does not necessarily reflect the official views of OSHA or the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • Employer Responsibilities Your employer must develop and provide a safe window cleaning operation to protect the safety and health of workers and the general public.

    Regardless of what type of equipment and tools may be used on the job, your employer must ensure that the equipment is properly inspected and maintained before it gets used. The employer must also ensure that employees are properly trained in a language they fully understand.

    Be sure to follow all manufacturers’ recommended guidelines for assembling, using, maintaining and inspecting any equipment used for cleaning windows.
  • Types of Window Cleaning Operations The following are the major types of window cleaning operations. Depending on the type of operation, workers may be faced with different safety and health hazards. The window cleaning industry is segmented into two categories: ground work and suspended work. Ground crews clean windows by accessing them using ground-based equipment, including extension poles, water fed poles, ladders and aerial man lifts. Suspended workers are supported on the sides and off the roofs of buildings while cleaning.
    • Commercial Work: Commercial work includes route work, low to mid-rise work and high-rise structures.
      • Route Work: A route company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on first or second floor commercial window cleaning and cleans these accounts on a recurring daily, weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis. This company’s accounts will include structures such as storefronts, shopping malls, professional buildings, restaurants, and automobile dealers.
      • Low to Mid-Rise Work: A low to mid-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on ground based operations that are typically performed on commercial buildings under five stories in height; often cleaned using non-suspended equipment such as ladders, extension poles, water fed poles and aerial work platforms.
      • High-Rise Commercial: A high-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on cleaning commercial structures that are more than four stories in height; often employees of high-rise window cleaning companies engage in suspended work using rope descending systems or suspended scaffolding.
    • Residential Work: A residential company is a window cleaning company that performs residential window cleaning.*
      *A residence is where people live, not where they work, so extra care and consideration must be taken to work safely around personal belongings, furniture, or stairs, for example.
    • Construction Cleaning: A post-construction cleaning company provides window cleaning services at the conclusion of the original construction of a structure. Construction cleaning occurs on both commercial and residential structures.
  • Purpose of Field Guide The purpose of this field guide is to provide you with a list of the major recognized safety hazards which may be encountered during professional window cleaning. This field guide also provides some of the key best practices to address these hazards and help you stay safe on the job.
  • Disclaimer Through the OSHA and International Window Cleaning Association (IWCA) Alliance, IWCA developed this material for informational purposes only. It does not necessarily reflect the official views of OSHA or the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • Employer Responsibilities Your employer must develop and provide a safe window cleaning operation to protect the safety and health of workers and the general public.

    Regardless of what type of equipment and tools may be used on the job, your employer must ensure that the equipment is properly inspected and maintained before it gets used. The employer must also ensure that employees are properly trained in a language they fully understand.

    Be sure to follow all manufacturers’ recommended guidelines for assembling, using, maintaining and inspecting any equipment used for cleaning windows.
  • Types of Window Cleaning Operations The following are the major types of window cleaning operations. Depending on the type of operation, workers may be faced with different safety and health hazards. The window cleaning industry is segmented into two categories: ground work and suspended work. Ground crews clean windows by accessing them using ground-based equipment, including extension poles, water fed poles, ladders and aerial man lifts. Suspended workers are supported on the sides and off the roofs of buildings while cleaning.
    • Commercial Work: Commercial work includes route work, low to mid-rise work and high-rise structures.
      • Route Work: A route company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on first or second floor commercial window cleaning and cleans these accounts on a recurring daily, weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis. This company’s accounts will include structures such as storefronts, shopping malls, professional buildings, restaurants, and automobile dealers.
      • Low to Mid-Rise Work: A low to mid-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on ground based operations that are typically performed on commercial buildings under five stories in height; often cleaned using non-suspended equipment such as ladders, extension poles, water fed poles and aerial work platforms.
      • High-Rise Commercial: A high-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on cleaning commercial structures that are more than four stories in height; often employees of high-rise window cleaning companies engage in suspended work using rope descending systems or suspended scaffolding.
    • Residential Work: A residential company is a window cleaning company that performs residential window cleaning.*
      *A residence is where people live, not where they work, so extra care and consideration must be taken to work safely around personal belongings, furniture, or stairs, for example.
    • Construction Cleaning: A post-construction cleaning company provides window cleaning services at the conclusion of the original construction of a structure. Construction cleaning occurs on both commercial and residential structures.
  • Purpose of Field Guide The purpose of this field guide is to provide you with a list of the major recognized safety hazards which may be encountered during professional window cleaning. This field guide also provides some of the key best practices to address these hazards and help you stay safe on the job.
  • Disclaimer Through the OSHA and International Window Cleaning Association (IWCA) Alliance, IWCA developed this material for informational purposes only. It does not necessarily reflect the official views of OSHA or the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • Employer Responsibilities Your employer must develop and provide a safe window cleaning operation to protect the safety and health of workers and the general public.

    Regardless of what type of equipment and tools may be used on the job, your employer must ensure that the equipment is properly inspected and maintained before it gets used. The employer must also ensure that employees are properly trained in a language they fully understand.

    Be sure to follow all manufacturers’ recommended guidelines for assembling, using, maintaining and inspecting any equipment used for cleaning windows.
  • Types of Window Cleaning Operations The following are the major types of window cleaning operations. Depending on the type of operation, workers may be faced with different safety and health hazards. The window cleaning industry is segmented into two categories: ground work and suspended work. Ground crews clean windows by accessing them using ground-based equipment, including extension poles, water fed poles, ladders and aerial man lifts. Suspended workers are supported on the sides and off the roofs of buildings while cleaning.
    • Commercial Work: Commercial work includes route work, low to mid-rise work and high-rise structures.
      • Route Work: A route company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on first or second floor commercial window cleaning and cleans these accounts on a recurring daily, weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis. This company’s accounts will include structures such as storefronts, shopping malls, professional buildings, restaurants, and automobile dealers.
      • Low to Mid-Rise Work: A low to mid-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on ground based operations that are typically performed on commercial buildings under five stories in height; often cleaned using non-suspended equipment such as ladders, extension poles, water fed poles and aerial work platforms.
      • High-Rise Commercial: A high-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on cleaning commercial structures that are more than four stories in height; often employees of high-rise window cleaning companies engage in suspended work using rope descending systems or suspended scaffolding.
    • Residential Work: A residential company is a window cleaning company that performs residential window cleaning.*
      *A residence is where people live, not where they work, so extra care and consideration must be taken to work safely around personal belongings, furniture, or stairs, for example.
    • Construction Cleaning: A post-construction cleaning company provides window cleaning services at the conclusion of the original construction of a structure. Construction cleaning occurs on both commercial and residential structures.
  • Purpose of Field Guide The purpose of this field guide is to provide you with a list of the major recognized safety hazards which may be encountered during professional window cleaning. This field guide also provides some of the key best practices to address these hazards and help you stay safe on the job.
  • Disclaimer Through the OSHA and International Window Cleaning Association (IWCA) Alliance, IWCA developed this material for informational purposes only. It does not necessarily reflect the official views of OSHA or the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • Employer Responsibilities Your employer must develop and provide a safe window cleaning operation to protect the safety and health of workers and the general public.

    Regardless of what type of equipment and tools may be used on the job, your employer must ensure that the equipment is properly inspected and maintained before it gets used. The employer must also ensure that employees are properly trained in a language they fully understand.

    Be sure to follow all manufacturers’ recommended guidelines for assembling, using, maintaining and inspecting any equipment used for cleaning windows.
  • Types of Window Cleaning Operations The following are the major types of window cleaning operations. Depending on the type of operation, workers may be faced with different safety and health hazards. The window cleaning industry is segmented into two categories: ground work and suspended work. Ground crews clean windows by accessing them using ground-based equipment, including extension poles, water fed poles, ladders and aerial man lifts. Suspended workers are supported on the sides and off the roofs of buildings while cleaning.
    • Commercial Work: Commercial work includes route work, low to mid-rise work and high-rise structures.
      • Route Work: A route company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on first or second floor commercial window cleaning and cleans these accounts on a recurring daily, weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis. This company’s accounts will include structures such as storefronts, shopping malls, professional buildings, restaurants, and automobile dealers.
      • Low to Mid-Rise Work: A low to mid-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on ground based operations that are typically performed on commercial buildings under five stories in height; often cleaned using non-suspended equipment such as ladders, extension poles, water fed poles and aerial work platforms.
      • High-Rise Commercial: A high-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on cleaning commercial structures that are more than four stories in height; often employees of high-rise window cleaning companies engage in suspended work using rope descending systems or suspended scaffolding.
    • Residential Work: A residential company is a window cleaning company that performs residential window cleaning.*
      *A residence is where people live, not where they work, so extra care and consideration must be taken to work safely around personal belongings, furniture, or stairs, for example.
    • Construction Cleaning: A post-construction cleaning company provides window cleaning services at the conclusion of the original construction of a structure. Construction cleaning occurs on both commercial and residential structures.
  • Purpose of Field Guide The purpose of this field guide is to provide you with a list of the major recognized safety hazards which may be encountered during professional window cleaning. This field guide also provides some of the key best practices to address these hazards and help you stay safe on the job.
  • Disclaimer Through the OSHA and International Window Cleaning Association (IWCA) Alliance, IWCA developed this material for informational purposes only. It does not necessarily reflect the official views of OSHA or the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • Employer Responsibilities Your employer must develop and provide a safe window cleaning operation to protect the safety and health of workers and the general public.

    Regardless of what type of equipment and tools may be used on the job, your employer must ensure that the equipment is properly inspected and maintained before it gets used. The employer must also ensure that employees are properly trained in a language they fully understand.

    Be sure to follow all manufacturers’ recommended guidelines for assembling, using, maintaining and inspecting any equipment used for cleaning windows.
  • Types of Window Cleaning Operations The following are the major types of window cleaning operations. Depending on the type of operation, workers may be faced with different safety and health hazards. The window cleaning industry is segmented into two categories: ground work and suspended work. Ground crews clean windows by accessing them using ground-based equipment, including extension poles, water fed poles, ladders and aerial man lifts. Suspended workers are supported on the sides and off the roofs of buildings while cleaning.
    • Commercial Work: Commercial work includes route work, low to mid-rise work and high-rise structures.
      • Route Work: A route company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on first or second floor commercial window cleaning and cleans these accounts on a recurring daily, weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis. This company’s accounts will include structures such as storefronts, shopping malls, professional buildings, restaurants, and automobile dealers.
      • Low to Mid-Rise Work: A low to mid-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on ground based operations that are typically performed on commercial buildings under five stories in height; often cleaned using non-suspended equipment such as ladders, extension poles, water fed poles and aerial work platforms.
      • High-Rise Commercial: A high-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on cleaning commercial structures that are more than four stories in height; often employees of high-rise window cleaning companies engage in suspended work using rope descending systems or suspended scaffolding.
    • Residential Work: A residential company is a window cleaning company that performs residential window cleaning.*
      *A residence is where people live, not where they work, so extra care and consideration must be taken to work safely around personal belongings, furniture, or stairs, for example.
    • Construction Cleaning: A post-construction cleaning company provides window cleaning services at the conclusion of the original construction of a structure. Construction cleaning occurs on both commercial and residential structures.
  • Purpose of Field Guide The purpose of this field guide is to provide you with a list of the major recognized safety hazards which may be encountered during professional window cleaning. This field guide also provides some of the key best practices to address these hazards and help you stay safe on the job.
  • Disclaimer Through the OSHA and International Window Cleaning Association (IWCA) Alliance, IWCA developed this material for informational purposes only. It does not necessarily reflect the official views of OSHA or the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • Employer Responsibilities Your employer must develop and provide a safe window cleaning operation to protect the safety and health of workers and the general public.

    Regardless of what type of equipment and tools may be used on the job, your employer must ensure that the equipment is properly inspected and maintained before it gets used. The employer must also ensure that employees are properly trained in a language they fully understand.

    Be sure to follow all manufacturers’ recommended guidelines for assembling, using, maintaining and inspecting any equipment used for cleaning windows.
  • Types of Window Cleaning Operations The following are the major types of window cleaning operations. Depending on the type of operation, workers may be faced with different safety and health hazards. The window cleaning industry is segmented into two categories: ground work and suspended work. Ground crews clean windows by accessing them using ground-based equipment, including extension poles, water fed poles, ladders and aerial man lifts. Suspended workers are supported on the sides and off the roofs of buildings while cleaning.
    • Commercial Work: Commercial work includes route work, low to mid-rise work and high-rise structures.
      • Route Work: A route company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on first or second floor commercial window cleaning and cleans these accounts on a recurring daily, weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis. This company’s accounts will include structures such as storefronts, shopping malls, professional buildings, restaurants, and automobile dealers.
      • Low to Mid-Rise Work: A low to mid-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on ground based operations that are typically performed on commercial buildings under five stories in height; often cleaned using non-suspended equipment such as ladders, extension poles, water fed poles and aerial work platforms.
      • High-Rise Commercial: A high-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on cleaning commercial structures that are more than four stories in height; often employees of high-rise window cleaning companies engage in suspended work using rope descending systems or suspended scaffolding.
    • Residential Work: A residential company is a window cleaning company that performs residential window cleaning.*
      *A residence is where people live, not where they work, so extra care and consideration must be taken to work safely around personal belongings, furniture, or stairs, for example.
    • Construction Cleaning: A post-construction cleaning company provides window cleaning services at the conclusion of the original construction of a structure. Construction cleaning occurs on both commercial and residential structures.
  • Purpose of Field Guide The purpose of this field guide is to provide you with a list of the major recognized safety hazards which may be encountered during professional window cleaning. This field guide also provides some of the key best practices to address these hazards and help you stay safe on the job.
  • Disclaimer Through the OSHA and International Window Cleaning Association (IWCA) Alliance, IWCA developed this material for informational purposes only. It does not necessarily reflect the official views of OSHA or the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • Employer Responsibilities Your employer must develop and provide a safe window cleaning operation to protect the safety and health of workers and the general public.

    Regardless of what type of equipment and tools may be used on the job, your employer must ensure that the equipment is properly inspected and maintained before it gets used. The employer must also ensure that employees are properly trained in a language they fully understand.

    Be sure to follow all manufacturers’ recommended guidelines for assembling, using, maintaining and inspecting any equipment used for cleaning windows.
  • Types of Window Cleaning Operations The following are the major types of window cleaning operations. Depending on the type of operation, workers may be faced with different safety and health hazards. The window cleaning industry is segmented into two categories: ground work and suspended work. Ground crews clean windows by accessing them using ground-based equipment, including extension poles, water fed poles, ladders and aerial man lifts. Suspended workers are supported on the sides and off the roofs of buildings while cleaning.
    • Commercial Work: Commercial work includes route work, low to mid-rise work and high-rise structures.
      • Route Work: A route company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on first or second floor commercial window cleaning and cleans these accounts on a recurring daily, weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis. This company’s accounts will include structures such as storefronts, shopping malls, professional buildings, restaurants, and automobile dealers.
      • Low to Mid-Rise Work: A low to mid-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on ground based operations that are typically performed on commercial buildings under five stories in height; often cleaned using non-suspended equipment such as ladders, extension poles, water fed poles and aerial work platforms.
      • High-Rise Commercial: A high-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on cleaning commercial structures that are more than four stories in height; often employees of high-rise window cleaning companies engage in suspended work using rope descending systems or suspended scaffolding.
    • Residential Work: A residential company is a window cleaning company that performs residential window cleaning.*
      *A residence is where people live, not where they work, so extra care and consideration must be taken to work safely around personal belongings, furniture, or stairs, for example.
    • Construction Cleaning: A post-construction cleaning company provides window cleaning services at the conclusion of the original construction of a structure. Construction cleaning occurs on both commercial and residential structures.
  • Purpose of Field Guide The purpose of this field guide is to provide you with a list of the major recognized safety hazards which may be encountered during professional window cleaning. This field guide also provides some of the key best practices to address these hazards and help you stay safe on the job.
  • Disclaimer Through the OSHA and International Window Cleaning Association (IWCA) Alliance, IWCA developed this material for informational purposes only. It does not necessarily reflect the official views of OSHA or the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • Employer Responsibilities Your employer must develop and provide a safe window cleaning operation to protect the safety and health of workers and the general public.

    Regardless of what type of equipment and tools may be used on the job, your employer must ensure that the equipment is properly inspected and maintained before it gets used. The employer must also ensure that employees are properly trained in a language they fully understand.

    Be sure to follow all manufacturers’ recommended guidelines for assembling, using, maintaining and inspecting any equipment used for cleaning windows.
  • Types of Window Cleaning Operations The following are the major types of window cleaning operations. Depending on the type of operation, workers may be faced with different safety and health hazards. The window cleaning industry is segmented into two categories: ground work and suspended work. Ground crews clean windows by accessing them using ground-based equipment, including extension poles, water fed poles, ladders and aerial man lifts. Suspended workers are supported on the sides and off the roofs of buildings while cleaning.
    • Commercial Work: Commercial work includes route work, low to mid-rise work and high-rise structures.
      • Route Work: A route company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on first or second floor commercial window cleaning and cleans these accounts on a recurring daily, weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis. This company’s accounts will include structures such as storefronts, shopping malls, professional buildings, restaurants, and automobile dealers.
      • Low to Mid-Rise Work: A low to mid-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on ground based operations that are typically performed on commercial buildings under five stories in height; often cleaned using non-suspended equipment such as ladders, extension poles, water fed poles and aerial work platforms.
      • High-Rise Commercial: A high-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on cleaning commercial structures that are more than four stories in height; often employees of high-rise window cleaning companies engage in suspended work using rope descending systems or suspended scaffolding.
    • Residential Work: A residential company is a window cleaning company that performs residential window cleaning.*
      *A residence is where people live, not where they work, so extra care and consideration must be taken to work safely around personal belongings, furniture, or stairs, for example.
    • Construction Cleaning: A post-construction cleaning company provides window cleaning services at the conclusion of the original construction of a structure. Construction cleaning occurs on both commercial and residential structures.
  • Purpose of Field Guide The purpose of this field guide is to provide you with a list of the major recognized safety hazards which may be encountered during professional window cleaning. This field guide also provides some of the key best practices to address these hazards and help you stay safe on the job.
  • Disclaimer Through the OSHA and International Window Cleaning Association (IWCA) Alliance, IWCA developed this material for informational purposes only. It does not necessarily reflect the official views of OSHA or the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • Employer Responsibilities Your employer must develop and provide a safe window cleaning operation to protect the safety and health of workers and the general public.

    Regardless of what type of equipment and tools may be used on the job, your employer must ensure that the equipment is properly inspected and maintained before it gets used. The employer must also ensure that employees are properly trained in a language they fully understand.

    Be sure to follow all manufacturers’ recommended guidelines for assembling, using, maintaining and inspecting any equipment used for cleaning windows.
  • Types of Window Cleaning Operations The following are the major types of window cleaning operations. Depending on the type of operation, workers may be faced with different safety and health hazards. The window cleaning industry is segmented into two categories: ground work and suspended work. Ground crews clean windows by accessing them using ground-based equipment, including extension poles, water fed poles, ladders and aerial man lifts. Suspended workers are supported on the sides and off the roofs of buildings while cleaning.
    • Commercial Work: Commercial work includes route work, low to mid-rise work and high-rise structures.
      • Route Work: A route company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on first or second floor commercial window cleaning and cleans these accounts on a recurring daily, weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis. This company’s accounts will include structures such as storefronts, shopping malls, professional buildings, restaurants, and automobile dealers.
      • Low to Mid-Rise Work: A low to mid-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on ground based operations that are typically performed on commercial buildings under five stories in height; often cleaned using non-suspended equipment such as ladders, extension poles, water fed poles and aerial work platforms.
      • High-Rise Commercial: A high-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on cleaning commercial structures that are more than four stories in height; often employees of high-rise window cleaning companies engage in suspended work using rope descending systems or suspended scaffolding.
    • Residential Work: A residential company is a window cleaning company that performs residential window cleaning.*
      *A residence is where people live, not where they work, so extra care and consideration must be taken to work safely around personal belongings, furniture, or stairs, for example.
    • Construction Cleaning: A post-construction cleaning company provides window cleaning services at the conclusion of the original construction of a structure. Construction cleaning occurs on both commercial and residential structures.
  • Purpose of Field Guide The purpose of this field guide is to provide you with a list of the major recognized safety hazards which may be encountered during professional window cleaning. This field guide also provides some of the key best practices to address these hazards and help you stay safe on the job.
  • Disclaimer Through the OSHA and International Window Cleaning Association (IWCA) Alliance, IWCA developed this material for informational purposes only. It does not necessarily reflect the official views of OSHA or the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • Employer Responsibilities Your employer must develop and provide a safe window cleaning operation to protect the safety and health of workers and the general public.

    Regardless of what type of equipment and tools may be used on the job, your employer must ensure that the equipment is properly inspected and maintained before it gets used. The employer must also ensure that employees are properly trained in a language they fully understand.

    Be sure to follow all manufacturers’ recommended guidelines for assembling, using, maintaining and inspecting any equipment used for cleaning windows.
  • Types of Window Cleaning Operations The following are the major types of window cleaning operations. Depending on the type of operation, workers may be faced with different safety and health hazards. The window cleaning industry is segmented into two categories: ground work and suspended work. Ground crews clean windows by accessing them using ground-based equipment, including extension poles, water fed poles, ladders and aerial man lifts. Suspended workers are supported on the sides and off the roofs of buildings while cleaning.
    • Commercial Work: Commercial work includes route work, low to mid-rise work and high-rise structures.
      • Route Work: A route company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on first or second floor commercial window cleaning and cleans these accounts on a recurring daily, weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis. This company’s accounts will include structures such as storefronts, shopping malls, professional buildings, restaurants, and automobile dealers.
      • Low to Mid-Rise Work: A low to mid-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on ground based operations that are typically performed on commercial buildings under five stories in height; often cleaned using non-suspended equipment such as ladders, extension poles, water fed poles and aerial work platforms.
      • High-Rise Commercial: A high-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on cleaning commercial structures that are more than four stories in height; often employees of high-rise window cleaning companies engage in suspended work using rope descending systems or suspended scaffolding.
    • Residential Work: A residential company is a window cleaning company that performs residential window cleaning.*
      *A residence is where people live, not where they work, so extra care and consideration must be taken to work safely around personal belongings, furniture, or stairs, for example.
    • Construction Cleaning: A post-construction cleaning company provides window cleaning services at the conclusion of the original construction of a structure. Construction cleaning occurs on both commercial and residential structures.
  • Purpose of Field Guide The purpose of this field guide is to provide you with a list of the major recognized safety hazards which may be encountered during professional window cleaning. This field guide also provides some of the key best practices to address these hazards and help you stay safe on the job.
  • Disclaimer Through the OSHA and International Window Cleaning Association (IWCA) Alliance, IWCA developed this material for informational purposes only. It does not necessarily reflect the official views of OSHA or the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • Employer Responsibilities Your employer must develop and provide a safe window cleaning operation to protect the safety and health of workers and the general public.

    Regardless of what type of equipment and tools may be used on the job, your employer must ensure that the equipment is properly inspected and maintained before it gets used. The employer must also ensure that employees are properly trained in a language they fully understand.

    Be sure to follow all manufacturers’ recommended guidelines for assembling, using, maintaining and inspecting any equipment used for cleaning windows.
  • Types of Window Cleaning Operations The following are the major types of window cleaning operations. Depending on the type of operation, workers may be faced with different safety and health hazards. The window cleaning industry is segmented into two categories: ground work and suspended work. Ground crews clean windows by accessing them using ground-based equipment, including extension poles, water fed poles, ladders and aerial man lifts. Suspended workers are supported on the sides and off the roofs of buildings while cleaning.
    • Commercial Work: Commercial work includes route work, low to mid-rise work and high-rise structures.
      • Route Work: A route company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on first or second floor commercial window cleaning and cleans these accounts on a recurring daily, weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis. This company’s accounts will include structures such as storefronts, shopping malls, professional buildings, restaurants, and automobile dealers.
      • Low to Mid-Rise Work: A low to mid-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on ground based operations that are typically performed on commercial buildings under five stories in height; often cleaned using non-suspended equipment such as ladders, extension poles, water fed poles and aerial work platforms.
      • High-Rise Commercial: A high-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on cleaning commercial structures that are more than four stories in height; often employees of high-rise window cleaning companies engage in suspended work using rope descending systems or suspended scaffolding.
    • Residential Work: A residential company is a window cleaning company that performs residential window cleaning.*
      *A residence is where people live, not where they work, so extra care and consideration must be taken to work safely around personal belongings, furniture, or stairs, for example.
    • Construction Cleaning: A post-construction cleaning company provides window cleaning services at the conclusion of the original construction of a structure. Construction cleaning occurs on both commercial and residential structures.
  • Purpose of Field Guide The purpose of this field guide is to provide you with a list of the major recognized safety hazards which may be encountered during professional window cleaning. This field guide also provides some of the key best practices to address these hazards and help you stay safe on the job.
  • Disclaimer Through the OSHA and International Window Cleaning Association (IWCA) Alliance, IWCA developed this material for informational purposes only. It does not necessarily reflect the official views of OSHA or the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • Employer Responsibilities Your employer must develop and provide a safe window cleaning operation to protect the safety and health of workers and the general public.

    Regardless of what type of equipment and tools may be used on the job, your employer must ensure that the equipment is properly inspected and maintained before it gets used. The employer must also ensure that employees are properly trained in a language they fully understand.

    Be sure to follow all manufacturers’ recommended guidelines for assembling, using, maintaining and inspecting any equipment used for cleaning windows.
  • Types of Window Cleaning Operations The following are the major types of window cleaning operations. Depending on the type of operation, workers may be faced with different safety and health hazards. The window cleaning industry is segmented into two categories: ground work and suspended work. Ground crews clean windows by accessing them using ground-based equipment, including extension poles, water fed poles, ladders and aerial man lifts. Suspended workers are supported on the sides and off the roofs of buildings while cleaning.
    • Commercial Work: Commercial work includes route work, low to mid-rise work and high-rise structures.
      • Route Work: A route company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on first or second floor commercial window cleaning and cleans these accounts on a recurring daily, weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis. This company’s accounts will include structures such as storefronts, shopping malls, professional buildings, restaurants, and automobile dealers.
      • Low to Mid-Rise Work: A low to mid-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on ground based operations that are typically performed on commercial buildings under five stories in height; often cleaned using non-suspended equipment such as ladders, extension poles, water fed poles and aerial work platforms.
      • High-Rise Commercial: A high-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on cleaning commercial structures that are more than four stories in height; often employees of high-rise window cleaning companies engage in suspended work using rope descending systems or suspended scaffolding.
    • Residential Work: A residential company is a window cleaning company that performs residential window cleaning.*
      *A residence is where people live, not where they work, so extra care and consideration must be taken to work safely around personal belongings, furniture, or stairs, for example.
    • Construction Cleaning: A post-construction cleaning company provides window cleaning services at the conclusion of the original construction of a structure. Construction cleaning occurs on both commercial and residential structures.
  • Purpose of Field Guide The purpose of this field guide is to provide you with a list of the major recognized safety hazards which may be encountered during professional window cleaning. This field guide also provides some of the key best practices to address these hazards and help you stay safe on the job.
  • Disclaimer Through the OSHA and International Window Cleaning Association (IWCA) Alliance, IWCA developed this material for informational purposes only. It does not necessarily reflect the official views of OSHA or the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • Employer Responsibilities Your employer must develop and provide a safe window cleaning operation to protect the safety and health of workers and the general public.

    Regardless of what type of equipment and tools may be used on the job, your employer must ensure that the equipment is properly inspected and maintained before it gets used. The employer must also ensure that employees are properly trained in a language they fully understand.

    Be sure to follow all manufacturers’ recommended guidelines for assembling, using, maintaining and inspecting any equipment used for cleaning windows.
  • Types of Window Cleaning Operations The following are the major types of window cleaning operations. Depending on the type of operation, workers may be faced with different safety and health hazards. The window cleaning industry is segmented into two categories: ground work and suspended work. Ground crews clean windows by accessing them using ground-based equipment, including extension poles, water fed poles, ladders and aerial man lifts. Suspended workers are supported on the sides and off the roofs of buildings while cleaning.
    • Commercial Work: Commercial work includes route work, low to mid-rise work and high-rise structures.
      • Route Work: A route company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on first or second floor commercial window cleaning and cleans these accounts on a recurring daily, weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis. This company’s accounts will include structures such as storefronts, shopping malls, professional buildings, restaurants, and automobile dealers.
      • Low to Mid-Rise Work: A low to mid-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on ground based operations that are typically performed on commercial buildings under five stories in height; often cleaned using non-suspended equipment such as ladders, extension poles, water fed poles and aerial work platforms.
      • High-Rise Commercial: A high-rise company is a window cleaning company that concentrates on cleaning commercial structures that are more than four stories in height; often employees of high-rise window cleaning companies engage in suspended work using rope descending systems or suspended scaffolding.
    • Residential Work: A residential company is a window cleaning company that performs residential window cleaning.*
      *A residence is where people live, not where they work, so extra care and consideration must be taken to work safely around personal belongings, furniture, or stairs, for example.
    • Construction Cleaning: A post-construction cleaning company provides window cleaning services at the conclusion of the original construction of a structure. Construction cleaning occurs on both commercial and residential structures.

Copyright © , PWCC Field Guide All Rights Reserved
Web Presence By Netphoria Inc